Archive | Hair Care

Early Menopause and Lupus

Early menopause occurs most often in women who are 30 to 40 years of age. It may occur in women younger than that with underlying causes. It very important that if you are suffering the signs of early menopause that you consult a doctor to rule out anything else that may be happening or a consequence of other health conditions. This is especially important if you have lupus and are experiencing signs of early menopause.

Lupus Symptoms

There are a few types of lupus including Discoid Lupus and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. Discoid Lupus most often affects the skin. It will present as a red rash that could have raised edges. It commonly occurs on the face and scalp. The rash is not itchy but scarring on the scalp can cause irreversible hair loss. Up to approximately 10% of those who have Discoid Lupus will develop Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

The most common complaints of those who suffer with systemic lupus erythematosus include fatigue, loss of appetite, muscle pain, arthritis and mouth/ nose ulcerations.

A facial rash (butterfly rash), photosensitivity and inflammation of the lining that surrounds the heart-pleuritis and the heart-pericarditis are also symptoms of lupus. Problems with circulation to the fingers and toes when it is really cold are also called Raynaud’s phenomenon. Inflammation of the brain, liver, and kidneys also occur in SLE. There may be a decrease in white blood cells and clotting factors. This increases the risk of infections and bleeding.

More than 50% of those with SLE will develop the flat red butterfly rash. Most SLE sufferers will develop a type of arthritis that is very similar to rheumatoid arthritis. The small joints of the hands, the wrists, and feet may swell, become painful, stiff and sometimes deformed. Inflammation of the blood vessels especially those that supply oxygen to tissues can cause nerve injury, injury to the skin, or injury to an internal organ.

These are some of the major and most common symptoms of systemic lupus erythematosus. Within each symptom is a set of sub-symptoms that result from the main symptoms. Lupus is an autoimmune disease that can be very treatable. It may also cause death depending on which body organs are affected.

The diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus is determined if a patient has four or more of eleven criteria. They are: malar-butterfly rash, discoid rash with patchy redness, photosensitivity (sensitivity to light), mucus membrane ulcers, arthritis, pleuritis and pericaridits-inflammations of the linings of the heart lungs along with pain when breathing, kidney abnormalities including an abnormal quantity of urine protein or clusters of cellular elements (casts), brain irritation, blood count abnormalities, immunological disorders-abnormal results of such tests as Anti-DNA, or anti-Sm, testing positive for antinuclear antibody.

Other tests could include a Sedimentation Rate, blood chemistry and evaluation of body fluids, as well as tissue biopsies. SLE can also cause one to enter early menopause

Treatments of systemic lupus erythematosus include get more rest during the active phases of the disease. Inadequate sleep is key in the progression of fatigue in SLE patients. A doctor must focus on poor sleep and the effects of depression, insufficient exercise and patient’s personal care coping abilities on their over-all health. Drugs that are used to relieve symptoms of SLE include non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs that help muscle, joint and other body tissue pain.

Corticosteroids are stronger in lessening inflammation and restoring the ability to function when SLE is active and they are helpful when internal organs are involved. They can be delivered in a number of forms but they have some serious side effects in long-term use at high doses. Thinning skin and bones, weight gain, infections, diabetes, facial puffiness, cataracts and even death (necrosis) of large joints are also possible. There is a wide variety of types of drugs used to treat mild to severe cases of SLE.

Symptoms of Early Menopause

Lupus and early menopause have some common symptoms. Sleep problems, heart palpitations, headaches and hot flashes that can occur in lupus and the patient not are menopausal. Irregular periods and bleeding are classic signs of beginning menopause. If you are a woman with lupus menstruation can continue but as has been mentioned become irregular and cease altogether catapulting you into early menopause. Other symptoms of it include appetite changes, weight gain, body aches, and mood swings all of which can also occur in lupus.

Early menopause in lupus can occur as a result of the disease itself. It can also be a result of the medications used to treat lupus. It can also be a result of heredity as opposed the disease or treatments of the disease.

Treatment of these symptoms can be HRT- hormone replacement therapy, anti-depressants, and anti-inflammatories. These treatments can have some very serious side effects such as increased risk for heart attack and some cancers. Most women seek to avoid these side effects and turn to natural treatments such as herbal supplementation.

Herbal supplements may also include vitamins such as B-complex and C vitamins and minerals such as magnesium and zinc. In order to get the highest quality supplement there should be no fillers or preservatives. The ingredients will have had the molecular path tested at the molecular level and their interactions evaluated as well. Only standardized herbal extracts are used and they are made to meet pharmaceutical grade standards. This all helps to guarantee top quality and consistent dosing from capsule to capsule.

Conclusion

Lupus is an autoimmune disease that can attack the skin discoid lupus erythematosus and systemic lupus erythematosus that affects the joints and internal organs. It is a connective tissue disease. Either the disease itself or the medications that are used to treat lupus can put a woman into early menopause. A doctor’s examination will help to determine the best course of treatment including the possible benefits of herbal supplementation.

Posted in Hair Care0 Comments

Suboptimal Thyroid Can Cause Weight Gain and Depression

One of Oprah’s viewers diagnosed her as having a problem with her thyroid. That was one factor in her constant struggle with weight. Your thyroid is the main hormone of metabolism and it affects your energy, weight, mood, temperature, fertility, menstrual cycles, hair growth, bowel movements, sleep and more. It’s a hormone that is sometimes misunderstood and it is suggested that the range of normal be changed. I will shed some light on the symptoms and tests. These are the most common symptoms and is not a complete list:

Symptoms of Overactive Thyroid- Hyperthyroidism

  • Rapid heart beat
  • Chest pain
  • Diarrhea
  • Insomnia
  • Weight loss
  • Irregular menses
  • Anxiety
  • Feel hot & sweaty

Symptom of Underactive Thyroid – Hypothyroidism

  • Weight gain
  • Fatigue
  • Constipation
  • Excess sleep
  • Depression
  • Dry coarse hair & skin
  • Poor memory
  • Hair loss
  • Muscle pain and weakness
  • Feeling cold

These symptoms can overlap with other conditions. You may have one or more of these and should report these to your doctor, have a check up and get laboratory studies to determine if an overactive or underactive thyroid is causing the symptoms. You may find a difference in opinion when it comes to measuring and interpreting thyroid levels. Here are some tests you should be aware of:

Thyroid Tests

  • TSH – this is a common screening test and most doctors order this. It is the signal from the pituitary gland in your brain that tells your thyroid to make more hormones. If it is high, it means it is shouting at your thyroid gland to make more hormones because your levels are too low. The common misinterpretation is that high means high thyroid levels and it is actually the opposite.
  • New range of normal – The current range of normal for TSH is quite wide 0.5-5. Normal and optimal are not the same. People with symptoms who are on either end of the range, may be considered normal and won’t be treated. The American Association of Clinical endocrinology and the National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry have recommended changing the range since people who don’t have severe symptoms may be suffering and can benefit from treatment. They recommend a range of 0.3-2.5.
  • Free versus bound – most hormones are carried through the blood stream by protein carriers. If they are bound to protein, they are inactive. When it comes to thyroid, the free hormone is what counts.
  • Free T4 – has 4 iodine molecules, it is a reserve or storage hormone that becomes active when it is converted to the active hormone free T3 by removing one iodine molecule.
  • Free T3 – is the active hormone. This conversion can be halted by aging, stress, nutritional deficiencies, trauma, infection, surgery, medications, hormone imbalance and diet. The hormone’s actions can also be blocked by thyroid antibodies (Antithyroglobulin or Anti Thyroid Peroxidase (TPO) Antibodies) and/or Reverse T3. The standard of care is to measure TSH and free T4 or to calculate free T4, however you can see that there is more to it than that. There also seems to be a subset of people with depression that respond better when a combination of T3 and T4 is given. The most commonly used thyroid replacement medication, synthroid, only has T4 and if you have a problem converting to the active form, it may not feel as effective.
  • Reverse T3 – binds to the same receptor as T3 and blocks its actions. If it is too high, even though all of the other lab tests are “normal” you may have symptoms of low thyroid function. The most common causes are stress and hormone imbalance. Anything that interferes with the conversion of free T4 to free T3 can also cause an elevation of reverse T3. The ratio of free T3 to reverse T3 is important. Just think of one as the gas (free T3) and the other the brake (reverse T3). If you are below the midpoint of the range of free T3 you have less gas, and if you are above the midpoint of the range of reverse T3 you have too much braking action.

Hormone balance is complex. It requires a nutritionally balanced diet, hormone balance, stress management and other factors. There may be restrictions on your doctor to do the full battery of thyroid tests. If that is the case, consult an anti aging, metabolic or functional medicine physician to help you get to the root cause of your issues and find a natural approach.

Posted in Hair Care0 Comments

What Are Mink Eyelashes?

Mink eyelashes are the most expensive and luxurious looking of all false eyelashes. Although available as lash extensions, they are normally found as strip lashes that are applied as when required.

False eyelashes have been around since 1916 when D. W. Griffith had a wig maker weave human hair through gauze and then glued to the eyeline of actress Seena Owen in the film Intolerance. No one really took much notice until the 60s, when they came back into fashion and were then made from synthetic substances. Mink eyelashes are more recent and preferred by celebrities who do not always wish for permanent implants.

Mink eyelashes are made from selected mink fur hairs that are simply brushed from live mink by hand. They are not subjected to chemicals or dyes and thus retain their rich velvety appearance. Their appearance is why so many of the A list celebrities wear them.

To care for your mink eyelashes, think of them like a mink coat! Don’t sleep in them or bring them into contact with water. Remove them carefully and then store properly when you don’t need them and they will last for up to 25 applications.

Your lashes will cost anywhere between $100 to $300 for a reasonable set and come as complete strips, bejewelled or in small clusters. You can also get individual lashes for lash extensions if you prefer this option, but of course you will need to have these professionally applied.

Beware when looking for mink eyelashes if you find cheap ones, as these are likely to be fakes. Look for high quality strip lashes that guaranteed to be 100% natural mink fur and you won’t be disappointed with your choice.

Posted in Hair Care0 Comments

Makeup and Cosmetic Cases – Choosing the Right One for Your Needs

Being a professional makeup artist is not an easy job. Whether you work with celebrities on movie or television sets or in a beauty salon for special occasions such as weddings, proms or birthdays the job of a true cosmetic artist is always filled with pressure, urgency and the need for precision and accuracy. When people request the services of a makeup artist it’s usually for something pretty important, which puts a lot of pressure on you – the makeup artist. The last thing a beautician wants to be doing is trying to find the right shade or brush – or in a worst case scenario realize that she forgot to bring the right brush or color!

Because of pressure filled situations such as the one described above, every makeup artists understands the importance of being highly organized when it comes to cosmetics and other tools of the trade. A good cosmetic case can go a long way toward making you more organized, but you must be careful to choose one that is right for your needs otherwise you can end up with an extra headache.

First decide on the size of the case you will need because they come in many sizes and shapes. How much makeup, cosmetics and brushes do you need to take with you to your assignments or to your salon? If you do not work with a wide variety of pallets and brushes you may opt for a smaller size makeup case in order to make thing easier to find and quick to retrieve. If however your practice involves hundreds of shades and many different brushes, you will need a larger case that can accommodate all your tools.

Next you should consider the tray and storage compartments of the cosmetic case you need. Once again this should be decided by the variety of colors and tools that you most often use. An optimal case will have easier to reach trays on top for your every day needs and deeper, pull-out trays underneath for those makeup shades that are used rarely, but still come in handy.

Finally decide if you will need a soft or a hard makeup case. A hard cosmetic case that is used for traveling in airplanes is called a train case. When deciding on the outside finish of your case consider your working and travel conditions. If you plan on checking in your case often or traveling with it a lot then a hardtop, aluminum or plastic shell case is the way to go. However if you need something that will easily fit into your carry-on luggage or just something to keep at the shop then a soft, leather case will do.

To summarize, remember that choosing the right makeup case is very important for a cosmetic professional because it can mean the difference between being able to find the right beauty tool or shade at the needed, urgent time or not. In this profession we all know the pressure we are under so try to reduce the gray hairs by staying organized and professional.

Posted in Hair Care0 Comments

Waxing Versus Sugaring for Male Grooming Treatments

Male hair removal methods have certainly evolved through the years. Gone are the days when men used a shaving blade to remove hair in different parts of their body. The advances in technology help male grooming become safer, healthier, faster and more convenient to do.

Men remove body hair for a variety of reasons. One is to improve their appearance. Women often do not like hairy men especially if a thick mane grows out of the chest or the back. Hairs coming out of the nostrils or a bushy monobrow are also very unattractive to look at. For men who are into sports such as swimming, getting pubic hair removed is almost a must since they look unsightly with Speedos and swimming trunks. Some men remove underarm hair for better grooming and to prevent body odour.

Male waxing and sugaring are two great examples of current male grooming techniques. These two hair removal methods have a number of similarities as well as differences when it comes to application. But they do serve the same purpose which is to get rid of unwanted man hair. An estimated third of the male population regularly do hair removal procedures in the back, chest, intimate areas, legs and other areas.

Waxing

Waxing for men, also called manscaping or more recently maxing, is a popular choice in salons or male grooming studios. Most men prefer to have a waxing treatment as opposed to some of the other temporary hair removal methods available because of the numerous advantages that waxing provides including:

Areas that have been waxed often remain hairless for at most eight weeks. The reason for this is because waxing removes hairs from the roots not just on the surface and for those clients who carry out regular body waxing benefit from a slower regrowth.

Smoother skin. Areas that are subjected to waxing often have smoother skin. The wax serves as natural exfoliant since it removes dead skin cells once the wax is removed. It not just uproots the hair but the dead cells on the skin too.

Softer hair. The hair that grows after waxing is usually much softer. Also, there are no signs of stubble after waxing unlike shaving.

Reduce skin irritation. Shaving may cause irritation to the skin especially if the blade touches sensitive parts. The person may have cuts and razor bumps from shaving. Not so with waxing.

Sugaring

Sugaring is another popular hair removal option. The sugaring mixture is made up of sugar, water and lemon juice. These ingredients are combined in a lukewarm temperature. They are then applied to the skin where unwanted hair grows. The technique originated in Egypt.

Sugaring for some male grooming clients offers the same benefits as listed above in terms of the appearance of the skin, the regrowth period and smoothness of the skin.

Some male clients are drawn towards sugaring as a suitable hair removal method if they have heat sensitive skin or react to the rosins found in a lot of waxes. However it is worth remembering that a lot of the good wax companies often offer a range of products that are rosin free to offer these clients a more comfortable waxing treatment with less trauma and better results on the skin.

Waxing and sugaring are similar processes but they do have differences in the application and results and clients should research the best options for themselves.

Both methods of hair removal use a similar process; strip waxing and strip sugaring – applying the product directly to the skin and then removing with a paper strip or a piece of fabric. Non -strip waxing and hand sugaring – applying hot wax or sugar paste directly to the hair and removing without the need for any paper or fabric.

More often male clients can have strong coarse body hair and with the waxing method it can offer a better hair removal technique for various reasons; the ” shrink wrapping ” effect of hot wax can encapsulate even the smallest of hairs to ensure a smooth hair free result, something that hand sugaring often cannot achieve. New generation non-strip / hot waxes can also be applied successfully to areas where hair grows in various directions, sugaring often does not achieve best results in these areas.

Degree of discomfort. Both procedures require hair removal from the roots. This means a certain degree of pain or discomfort in both methods, but it is worth stating that for most clients this discomfort is minimal and if these treatments are carried out by a professional trained male grooming therapist as opposed to friends or partners then the difference is remarkable!! You only need to look on YouTube to see those terrible home waxing videos…

Waxing and sugaring may not be a permanent solution to male hair removal but they do provide a viable option for male grooming. The long duration before hair grows back makes them a popular choice among male clients. Both procedures are effective hair removal solutions.

Posted in Hair Care0 Comments

Autoimmune Disorders – Ayurvedic Herbal Treatment

Autoimmune disorders are diseases in which the immune system of the body attacks normal healthy tissue and produces different symptoms of diseases. Nearly 160 diseases are listed as autoimmune disorders; common ones include rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes, psoriasis, alopecia areata, SLE, thyroiditis, Addison’s disease, pernicious anaemia, celiac disease, Multiple Sclerosis, and Guillain Barre Syndrome.

A genetic predisposition is usually required for the commencement of autoimmune disorders, along with environmental triggers such as infections (bacteria, virus), food allergies, toxins (drugs, smoking, hair dyes, and chemicals) and physical trauma. Common symptoms include joint and muscle pain, general muscle weakness, rashes, low-grade fever, lack of concentration, weight loss, numbness and tingling, dry eyes, hair loss, breathlessness, and palpitations. The hallmark of autoimmune disorders is inflammation, which can affect the heart, brain, lungs, nerves, muscles, skin, eyes, joints, kidneys, glands (thyroid, pancreas etc.) and produce symptoms according to the organ and tissue affected.

The modern system of treatment of autoimmune diseases is by suppressing the immunity with the use of steroids or non steroid medicines such as cyclophosphamide, and vaccines where possible. This treatment can give good results on a short-term basis but it does not cure the autoimmune disease and can result in serious side effects later on. Ayurvedic treatment scores positively in this aspects because it brings about immunomodulation so that the body defence system can gradually take over and help cure the disease completely. This may possibly take more time; immuno-suppressants can bring about improvement of symptoms within a few weeks to a few months, while Ayurvedic treatment may be required from a few months to a few years, depending upon the severity and complexity of the disease.

As mentioned earlier, inflammation is the hallmark of all autoimmune diseases. Steroids can treat inflammation very well; however, the long-term side effects of steroids can be as serious – or probably more serious – than the disease itself. Ayurvedic herbal medicines can significantly reduce pain and inflammation in chronic rheumatoid arthritis. Itching and recurrence of psoriasis can be treated very well with Ayurvedic treatment. Herbs can effectively treat inflammation of glands such as that occurs in thyroiditis, or inflammation and destruction of arteries, nerves, mucosa, muscles, connective tissue and skin such as that occurring in SLE, celiac disease, scleroderma, multiple sclerosis, Guillain Barre Syndrome etc.

While steroids and immunosuppressants are common therapy for all autoimmune disorders, the Ayurvedic treatment for each autoimmune disease varies considerably according to the body organs or systems affected. Medical protocol for treatment will also vary considerably according to the severity of symptoms, as well as the treatment response of affected individuals. Most medicines which act on the ‘Rakta’, ‘Mansa’, ‘Med’, and ‘Majja’ tissues are effective in the treatment of autoimmune disorders. These include herbs like Manjishtha (Rubia cordifolia), Saariva (Hemidesmus indicus), Kutki (Picrorrhiza kurroa), and Patol (Tricosanthe dioica). Immunomodulating herbs are also quite important for treating autoimmune diseases and include Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera), Bala (Sida cordifolia), Guduchi (Tinospora cordifolia) and Amalaki (Emblica officinalis).

Most affected individuals on immuno-suppressants experience a relapse or flare-up after about 5 to 6 months of therapy. Ayurvedic treatment may bring about improvement within 4 to 6 months; however the slow improvement is worth it since the patient start going into a full remission and the disease can be completely controlled with regular therapy of 12 to 24 months. After this, medicines can be gradually tapered and stopped completely. Further treatment can be given as short courses as and when – or if – required. Ayurvedic treatment can thus be utilized successfully to provide a comprehensive treatment for most of the common autoimmune disorders.

Posted in Hair Care0 Comments

History of the Curling Iron

History of the curling iron. Is there such a thing or is the curling iron just a modern invention? Each generation is the same. We think we have invented something new when perhaps all we have done is to modify “old inventions” by applying modern technology. Let us begin to investigate the history of the curling iron or, as it is also known, the curling tong.

Let us begin with the definition of a curling iron. It is a tool, a cylindrical metal appliance, used to change the structure of the hair by applying heat to a lock of hair that has been curled around it. It is natural to think with a modern mind and assume that the heat is generated by electricity. However, the curling iron goes way back before the introduction of electricity.

We only have to look at carvings from the ancient world to see that people cared about the style of their hair and that a popular style involved creating curls. Babylonian and Assyrian men dyed their hair and square beards black and crimped and curled them with curling irons. Persian nobles also curled their hair and beards, quite often staining them.

Egyptian nobles, men and women, cropped their hair close but later, for coolness and cleanliness in their hot climate, shaved their heads. On ceremonial occasions, for protection from the sun, they wore wigs. The wigs would be short and curly or long and full of curls or braids. The Science Museum has an example of curling tongs used by rich Egyptians to prepare their wigs.

In classical Greece it is known that the upper classes used curling irons.

Through time there have been many methods devised to curl hair and to keep the curl in place. For example, in 1906 Charles L. Nessler, a German hairdresser working in London, applied a borax paste and curled hair with an iron to produce the first permanent waves. This costly process took twelve hours. Eight years later, Eugene Sutter adapted the method by creating a dryer containing twenty heaters to do the job of waving more efficiently. Sutter was followed by Gaston Boudou, who modified Sutter’s dryer and invented an automatic roller. By 1920, Rambaud, a Paris beautician, had perfected a system of curling and drying permed hair for softer, looser curls by using an electric hot-air dryer, an innovation of the period made by the Racine Universal Motor Company of Racine, Wisconsin. A significant breakthrough came in 1945, when French chemist Eugene Schueller of L’Oréal laboratories combined the action of thioglycolic acid with hydrogen peroxide to produce the first cold permanent wave, which was cheaper and faster than the earlier hot processes. To control the amount of curl, varying diameter of rods were used for rolling. Technology to hold hair in place was advanced in 1960 when L’Oréal laboratories introduced a polymer hair spray to serve as an invisible net.

The curling iron has remained a favoured tool in spite of all the chemical inventions. We have moved on from the metal rods heated by insertion into hot coals or heating on gas or electric stoves. With no control of the heat of the iron there must have been many cases of singed hair, not to mention burnt fingers and scalps! Modern day styles demand more control and flexibility of hair style with hair looking loose rather than “glued into place”. Electrically heated and electronically controlled irons and tongs are now available. The barrels come in varying sizes enabling a tight curl or loose falling curl finish. Some have a smooth easy-glide ceramic barrel to create a super smooth finish and you can also purchase drop curl hair tongs with a cone shaped tong to create loose, tumbling waves and tousled curls. The fluctuation in hair styles from curly to straight and back again means manufacturers will continue to dream up new innovations to attract both professional hair stylists and the consumer.

So who “invented” the curling iron? Inevitably you find many references to “invented” and “patented by” or “introduced by”. The original inventor is lost in the mists of time but examples of the previous sentence are:

In1866, Hiram Maxim, who designed the machine gun bearing his name, applied for and obtained the first of many patents at age 26 for a hair-curling iron.

Four years later in 1890 two Frenchmen, Maurice Lentheric and Marcel Grateau, used hot-air drying and heated curling tongs to make deep, long-lasting Marcel waves.

The Straightening comb however, is actually credited as first being invented by the late 19th century French hairdresser, Marcel Grateau, who also, invented the curling iron, the permanent wave and later the Gillette safety razor which became popular in Germany after World War I.

In related developments, Rene Lelievre and Roger Lemoine invented an electric curling iron in 1959.

The pressing/curling iron was patented by Theora Stephens on October 21, 1980.

In August 1987 the Wahl Clipper Corporation introduced to the professional market the ZeeCurl. This flat-barrel curling iron gave stylists a tool to create new hairstyles with Z-shaped curls, adding texture and body to all types of hair. In 1988, FrenZee, the consumer version, was added.

There is little doubt that fashion will demand and dictate new innovations to ensure continuation of the history of the curling iron.

Rodger Cresswell

Posted in Hair Care0 Comments

Is Aftershave Needed When Using Electric Razors?

Generally, men use aftershave lotions or creams after shaving their facial hair. Aftershave contains moisturizers that smoothen and soften your face. But, when using mens electric shavers, do you really need to apply aftershave?

Mens electric shavers have been manufactured and sold around the world for quite some time. Both men and women have even moved on from traditional razor blades to electric shavers in removing unwanted facial hair. One of the most important benefits you can get from using an electric razor when shaving is that you get a clean shave without the necessity of using aftershave.

Electric razors are one of the most convenient shaving tools. Though, for those who are always busy or in a hurry, some people do not have the luxury of time to use electric razors, much less the traditional razors which require more shaving time than is comfortable for a busy bee.

By using an electric shave, you don’t really have any need for shaving creams or foams on your face. As a matter of fact, the only thing you need is electricity—plus your electric razor, of course. Applying or lathering your face with an aftershave is an option when you are using an electric razor.

However, using aftershave or pre-shave can benefit you as well. Pre-shave lotions or pre-shave creams can harden your facial hair and make them stand, providing ease when you remove them through electric razors. Consequently, you need to choose a pre-shave that is suited well for electric razors.

Aftershave, on the other hand, can help in closing and tightening your pores after shaving. Also, it helps moisturize your skin. However, if you have a sensitive skin, you ought to avoid using aftershave or other alcohol-based aftershaves. As an alternative, you can use a relaxing aftershave balm—or make one of your own from organic and all-natural ingredients.

In addition, using aftershave can damage your skin specifically if it is sensitive and it has cuts and wounds. Aftershaves are used primarily for desensitizing your skin after shaving. It is much recommended that you wash your face. Also, if your face has small cuts or wounds, you should not use aftershave. It might penetrate into your inner skin, causing irritation.

Applying aftershave on your face after using mens electric shavers is really just your choice. If you want to make your face look softer then you can use aftershave, but really, it’s not a requirement.

Posted in Hair Care0 Comments

Autoimmune Disorders – Ayurvedic Herbal Treatment

Autoimmune disorders are diseases in which the immune system of the body attacks normal healthy tissue and produces different symptoms of diseases. Nearly 160 diseases are listed as autoimmune disorders; common ones include rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes, psoriasis, alopecia areata, SLE, thyroiditis, Addison’s disease, pernicious anaemia, celiac disease, Multiple Sclerosis, and Guillain Barre Syndrome.

A genetic predisposition is usually required for the commencement of autoimmune disorders, along with environmental triggers such as infections (bacteria, virus), food allergies, toxins (drugs, smoking, hair dyes, and chemicals) and physical trauma. Common symptoms include joint and muscle pain, general muscle weakness, rashes, low-grade fever, lack of concentration, weight loss, numbness and tingling, dry eyes, hair loss, breathlessness, and palpitations. The hallmark of autoimmune disorders is inflammation, which can affect the heart, brain, lungs, nerves, muscles, skin, eyes, joints, kidneys, glands (thyroid, pancreas etc.) and produce symptoms according to the organ and tissue affected.

The modern system of treatment of autoimmune diseases is by suppressing the immunity with the use of steroids or non steroid medicines such as cyclophosphamide, and vaccines where possible. This treatment can give good results on a short-term basis but it does not cure the autoimmune disease and can result in serious side effects later on. Ayurvedic treatment scores positively in this aspects because it brings about immunomodulation so that the body defence system can gradually take over and help cure the disease completely. This may possibly take more time; immuno-suppressants can bring about improvement of symptoms within a few weeks to a few months, while Ayurvedic treatment may be required from a few months to a few years, depending upon the severity and complexity of the disease.

As mentioned earlier, inflammation is the hallmark of all autoimmune diseases. Steroids can treat inflammation very well; however, the long-term side effects of steroids can be as serious – or probably more serious – than the disease itself. Ayurvedic herbal medicines can significantly reduce pain and inflammation in chronic rheumatoid arthritis. Itching and recurrence of psoriasis can be treated very well with Ayurvedic treatment. Herbs can effectively treat inflammation of glands such as that occurs in thyroiditis, or inflammation and destruction of arteries, nerves, mucosa, muscles, connective tissue and skin such as that occurring in SLE, celiac disease, scleroderma, multiple sclerosis, Guillain Barre Syndrome etc.

While steroids and immunosuppressants are common therapy for all autoimmune disorders, the Ayurvedic treatment for each autoimmune disease varies considerably according to the body organs or systems affected. Medical protocol for treatment will also vary considerably according to the severity of symptoms, as well as the treatment response of affected individuals. Most medicines which act on the ‘Rakta’, ‘Mansa’, ‘Med’, and ‘Majja’ tissues are effective in the treatment of autoimmune disorders. These include herbs like Manjishtha (Rubia cordifolia), Saariva (Hemidesmus indicus), Kutki (Picrorrhiza kurroa), and Patol (Tricosanthe dioica). Immunomodulating herbs are also quite important for treating autoimmune diseases and include Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera), Bala (Sida cordifolia), Guduchi (Tinospora cordifolia) and Amalaki (Emblica officinalis).

Most affected individuals on immuno-suppressants experience a relapse or flare-up after about 5 to 6 months of therapy. Ayurvedic treatment may bring about improvement within 4 to 6 months; however the slow improvement is worth it since the patient start going into a full remission and the disease can be completely controlled with regular therapy of 12 to 24 months. After this, medicines can be gradually tapered and stopped completely. Further treatment can be given as short courses as and when – or if – required. Ayurvedic treatment can thus be utilized successfully to provide a comprehensive treatment for most of the common autoimmune disorders.

Posted in Hair Care0 Comments

Adaptogens Restore Hair Naturally

At 30 years of age I began to lose my hair. At first I noticed the clumps of hair in the brush, then my hairline receded, followed by the obvious thinning. Concerned, I began using over-the-counter topical solutions to try to stop my hair loss. When that didn’t work, I went for the expensive shampoos and leave-in rinses. In their defense these products did seem to slow the hair loss down, but it didn’t stop the problem like the products claimed they would.

In the meantime, I was in Traditional Chinese Medical College. Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), is a holistic approach to health and wholeness. It incorporates every aspect of our lives. There are several therapies or modalities under the TCM umbrella that are used to heal the body and mind. Herbalism and acupuncture are the most well-known.

Early on in school, I became highly interested in herbs — not just any herbs, but tonic herbs. These are commonly known in Western medicine as adaptogens. I was looking for something that could give me extra energy, and help with personal growth.

Adaptogens help the body to “adapt” to all kinds of stressors, whether mental, emotional, physical, or environmental. They do so by restoring the adrenals, the body’s primary mechanism for dealing with stressors. Since the adrenals are the primary mechanism for regulating our energy, which in turn affects personal growth, I started using these herbs.

After using them for a short while, I noticed that less hair was falling out when I showered. And, my hairline was returning! At first, I didn’t realize it was the herbs. I figured it was the result of using the shampoos and other topical formulas. Until one day while studying for an herbal exam, I ran across a story about one of the herbs I was using. Depending on the version of the story, it varies a bit. As many stories, this one was most likely a myth more than actual truth, a myth designed to convey a hidden truth.

The story is about an old man named He (pronounced Huh). One day while walking in the woods Old Man He got lost. He wasn’t a strong man, in fact, he was known as the runt of the litter. Feeble and slumped, Mr. He had a very gray beard and thinning, white hair. While searching for a way back home, he stumbles onto two trees with their vines intertwined together. Being hungry, he dug up the roots and prepared them for food.

Some time passed until one day he found his way back home. Upon entering his village, all of those who knew him before were astounded by what they saw. His countenance was that of a much younger man. His white, thinning hair, and gray beard turned thick and black. After they heard him tell his tale, they all figured that his youthful change had do to the herb that sustained him while he was lost in the forest. Therefore, they named this herb, He Shou Wu, which translates to He’s black hair.

Coincidentally, this herb was one of the main ingredients in my homemade formula. I knew it had powerful restorative and energy effects, but I had no idea that its chief function was to stop hair loss and restore hair growth.

He Shou Wu is actually the Polygonum Multiflorum plant. The Chinese commonly refer to it as Fo Ti. There are trace minerals in Fo Ti that play a significant role in the prevention of graying hair. Fo Ti is rich in the necessary trace minerals, calcium, manganese, and iron, which keep the hair strong and maintain its normal color. Fo Ti is also an adaptogen. Like other adaptogens, it restores the adrenals — the storage place for our sex hormones. As we get older, these hormones become depleted through stress.

Western science is beginning to understand what the Chinese Physicians have known for thousands of years regarding these hormones — they are responsible for keeping us youthful and help us maintain our vitality. This means they are also responsible for a healthy head of hair!

Intrigued, I did a more in-depth research of the herbs and found that many more of these adaptogenic herbs existed! I began adding them to my formula. Ten years later the results speak for themselves! I have a healthy head of hair. In all actuality, I don’t take the herbs for hair loss; I take them for their overall restorative effects. But, if I can keep a full, healthy head of hair as a result, then I am all for it!

Here are some things to consider when looking for adaptogens or adaptogenic supplements:

1. Make sure of the quality; know your sources and the manufacturing process. Many manufacturers denature the herbs in order to mass-produce them.

2. Also, know how much of the product is actually adaptogens and not fillers or other ingredients. Some products say they have many adaptogens in their products, and they do; but, the real question is what is the quantity of the herbs? Check for the milligram dosage to know for sure.

3. Look to see how much of the total product the adaptogens account for in relation to the other ingredients? The ratio may show that though there are adaptogenic herbs in the product, there are more of other ingredients, which means the herbs are like condiments in the product–just a dash.

If you truly are interested in more information regarding adaptogens. Visit ShenTrition online.

Here’s to your healthy mane.

Posted in Hair Care0 Comments

Page 3 of 8412345...102030...Last »
Advert